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University of Wollongong Australia

Law: Secondary Sources

Secondary sources

Journal Articles - Australian:

Journals are published more quickly than books and provide a current in-depth and theoretical analysis of your topic. Journal articles can provide an overview on the law or focus on specific or specialised aspects of the law. They also provide case or legislative summaries, expert scholarly opinions, discussions on proposed law reforms, and can lead to related cases and articles.*

TIP: Don't forget to check the currency, accuracy, and reliability of information provided in journal articles (unless doing historical research). Recent amendments to the law or new judgments may have occurred since the article was published.*

Journal Articles - International:

Journals are published more quickly than books and provide a current in-depth and theoretical analysis of your topic. Journal articles can provide an overview on the law or focus on specific or specialised aspects of the law. They also provide case or legislative summaries, expert scholarly opinions, discussions on proposed law reforms, and can lead to related cases and articles.*

TIP: Don't forget to check the currency, accuracy, and reliability of information provided in journal articles (unless doing historical research). Recent amendments to the law or new judgments may have occurred since the article was published.*

International Legal Materials:

TIP: Always check the currency, accuracy, and reliability of material you find.

Legal Commentary (Loose-leaf services):

Legal commentaries, also known as loose-leaf services, provide a detailed, up-to-date, comprehensive overview of an area of law. They contain of a mixture of commentary, legislation, practical information, interpretation of the law, and key cases.*

TIP: Don't forget to check the currency of information provided in commentaries.

Legal Dictionaries & Legal Encyclopedias:

Legal Dictionaries provide authoritative definitions of legal terms placed within their legal context. Dictionaries sometimes cite key cases and legislation which define terms. It is important to use a dictionary relevant to your jurisdiction.*

Legal Encyclopedias are a great starting place when researching an unfamiliar area of law. They provide an overview and history of the law, and list key legislation and cases.*

For more dictionaries and encyclopedias:

Search the Catalogue using a keyword search

keyword AND dictionar*

keyword AND encyclop*

Newspapers:

We have a wide range of Australian and international newspapers in digital, print and/or microfilm formats. This link will take you to the Newspapers & News Services Guide.

Court Forms, Model Forms and Precedents:

Court Fees:

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Legal abbreviations

Tutorials

How to use Lexis Advance

How to use Westlaw AU

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Source

* Jay Sanderson and Kim Kelly (eds), A Practical Guide to Legal Research (Thomson Reuters, 4th ed, 2017).

** Enid Campbell, Lee Poh-York and Joycey Tooher, Legal Research; Materials and Methods, (4th ed, 1996) 97.

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